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Lydia Woodward

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Lydia Woodward
Lydia Woodward
Personal details
Birth place USA
Profession Motion picture writer and producer
Years active 1983 to present
IMDb 0940963
ER
Role Executive Producer
Writer
Seasons 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 11, & 12
First episode "Day One"
Last episode "No Place to Hide"
Credits 158 episodes (see below)
Lydia Woodward is an American motion picture writer and producer. She is a writer and producer for ER, rising to the position of Executive Producer during her time on the show. She has also worked on the series St. Elsewhere, China Beach, Citizen Baines, Presidio Med, The Riches, and Pan Am.

BiographyEdit

Early lifeEdit

She attended Colgate University in Hamilton New York and graduated in 1973.[1] She then studied for an MBA from UCLA.

CareerEdit

She spent a year at the American Film Institute during which she made her television debut as a producer for "Miss Lonelyhearts", an episode of American Playhouse, in 1983. She was unable to find further motion picture work and spent time at business school, working in a governor's office and working with the nation's bicentennial committee. She took a job as an assistant to a literary agent which gave her insight into the motion picture industry. She had a production assistant job for Disney Sunday Night Movie. She did not enjoy the position, had a difficult relationship with her boss and was fired after seven months.

She then turned her attention to writing, beginning with spec scripts for situation comedies. She landed an agent on the strength of her spec scripts. She sold a script to The Slap Maxwell Show. She then wrote the story for "John Doe, We Hardly Knew Ye", a first season episode of Hooperman in 1987. The teleplay was written by Rick Kellard.

This led to work as a Story Editor for the sixth and final season of the medical drama St. Elsewhere in fall 1987. She co-wrote the teleplay for the fifteenth episode "Fairytale Theater" with Grace McKeaney from a story by John Tinker. She wrote the teleplay for the nineteenth episode "Requiem for a Heavyweight" from a story by Mark Tinker and Channing Gibson.

She joined the crew of China Beach as an Executive Script Consultant for the second season in fall 1988. She remained in this role for the third season in fall 1989. She was promoted to producer for the fourth and final season in fall 1990. The fourth season producers were nominated for the Emmy Award for Outstanding Drama Series in 1991. Woodward, Carol Flint, John Wells and John Sacret Young were nominated for a Humanitas Prize for writing a China Beach episode.

Following China Beach, Woodward worked on various pilot projects which either weren't made or, if they did air, were short-lived. One idea was for a college drama which she researched at Colgate.

She joined the crew of ER as a Supervising Producer and writer for the first season in fall 1994. She debuted with the second episode "Day One". She wrote the third episode "Going Home". She wrote the teleplay for the seventh episode "Another Perfect Day" from a story by Lance Gentile. She was promoted to Co-Executive Producer after the mid-season break beginning with the twelfth episode "Happy New Year". She also wrote "Happy New Year". She wrote the sixteenth episode "Make of Two Hearts". She wrote the twenty fourth episode "Motherhood". The first season producers were nominated for the Emmy Award for Outstanding Drama Series in 1995.

She returned as a Co-Executive Producer and writer for the second season in fall 1995. She wrote the second episode "Summer Run", the sixth episode "Days Like This", the fourteenth episode "The Right Thing", and the twenty first episode "Take These Broken Wings". The second season producers won the Emmy Award for Outstanding Drama Series in 1996.

She was promoted to Executive Producer for the third season in fall 1996. She wrote the second episode "Let the Games Begin". She co-wrote the story for the episode "Ask Me No Questions, I'll Tell You No Lies" with Neal Baer; the teleplay was written by Barbara Hall. She wrote the fifteenth episode "The Long Way Around". She wrote the teleplay for the twenty first episode "Make a Wish" from a story by Joe Sachs. The third season producers were again nominated for the Emmy Award for Outstanding Drama Series in 1997.

She remained an Executive Producer for the fourth season in fall 1997. She wrote the second episode "Something New" and the season finale "A Hole in the Heart". The fourth season producers were again nominated for the Emmy Award for Outstanding Drama Series in 1998.

She remained an Executive Producer for the fifth season in fall 1998. She took over as show runner from John Wells but he remained an Executive Producer. She wrote the season premiere "Day For Knight", the ninth episode "Good Luck, Ruth Johnson", the thirteenth episode "Choosing Joi", and the season finale "Getting to Know You". The fifth season producers were again nominated for the Emmy Award for Outstanding Drama Series in 1999.

She continued as show runner and an Executive Producer for the sixth season in fall 1999. She wrote the season premiere "Leave It to Weaver", the thirteenth episode "Be Still My Heart", and the nineteenth episode "The Fastest Year". Jack Orman replaced her as the series show runner. The sixth season producers were again nominated for the Emmy Award for Outstanding Drama Series in 2000.

She created and developed Citizen Baines for CBS during the 2000 to 2001 pilot season. The show was ordered to series and she served as an Executive Producer for the project. It was canceled after nine episodes had been producer, although only six were aired.

She co-created the medical drama Presidio Med with Wells. The pilot was ordered to series by CBS for the 2002 to 2003 television season. Woodward was an Executive Producer for the project. The show was canceled after fourteen episodes.

She returned to ER as a Consulting Producer for the eleventh season in fall 2004. She wrote the seventh episode "White Guy, Dark Hair" and the fourteenth episode "Just as I Am". She co-wrote the nineteenth episode "Ruby Redux" with Lisa Zwerling. She remained a writer for the twelfth season in fall 2005. She wrote the ninth episode "I Do" and the nineteenth episode "No Place to Hide".

She went on to write for The Riches in 2007. She wrote the fourth episode "The Big Floss" and co-wrote the eleventh episode "It's a Wonderful Lie" with Dawn Prestwich & Nicole Yorkin.

She was a Co-Executive Producer and writer for the new ABC drama Pan Am in the 2011 to 2012 season. The show was created by her ER colleague Jack Orman. She co-wrote the teleplay for the fifth episode "One Coin in a Fountain" with Jill Abbinanti from a story she had written. She co-wrote the ninth episode "Kiss Kiss Bang Bang" with Moira Walley-Beckett. The show was canceled after fourteen episodes.

CreditsEdit

Supervising ProducerEdit

Co-Executive ProducerEdit

Executive ProducerEdit

Consulting ProducerEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Lydia Woodward profile in The Colgate Scene

External links Edit

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